Exterior of The Met Cloisters

The Met Cloisters

About the Museum


Boppard Room at The Met Cloisters Museum and Gardens
© The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Boppard Room at The Met Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Exterior of The Met Cloisters
Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo: The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Brett Beyer

Exterior of The Met Cloisters

Late Gothic Hall
© The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, photo

Late Gothic Hall

The Met Cloisters, Cuxa Cloister
Photo: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met Cloisters, Cuxa Cloister

The Met Cloisters, which opened to the public in 1938, is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. Located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan, on a spectacular four-acre lot overlooking the Hudson River, the modern museum building is not a copy of any specific medieval structure but an ensemble informed by a selection of historical precedents, with a deliberate combination of ecclesiastical and secular spaces arranged in chronological order. Elements from medieval cloisters and from other historic sites in Europe have been incorporated into the fabric of the building. Approximately 3,000 works of art from medieval Europe comprise the rest of the collection, dating from the 9th through the 16th centuries. Medieval manuscripts, marvelous stone sarcophagi and carved reliquaries are all found here, as well as a wondrous treasury containing many exquisite jeweled objects. 

Photograph: Bonnefont Cloister at The Cloisters museum and gardens Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Collection Highlights


Cuxa Cloister, made in present-day France, Catalan
Cuxa Cloister, made in present-day France, Catalan
Beaker with Apes, made in probably the Burgundian territories, South Netherlandish
Beaker with Apes, made in probably the Burgundian territories, South Netherlandish
Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), South Netherlandish
Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), South Netherlandish
The Unicorn in Captivity, South Netherlandish
The Unicorn in Captivity, South Netherlandish
The Cloisters Playing Cards
The Cloisters Playing Cards
The Met Cloisters: Collection Highlights
Cuxa Cloister, made in present-day France, Catalan
Cuxa Cloister, made in present-day France, Catalan, c.1130-40
marble, 2,743 cm x 2,377 cm
The Cloisters Collection, 1925 (25.120.398–.954) Photo: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Beaker with Apes, made in probably the Burgundian territories, South Netherlandish
Beaker with Apes, made in probably the Burgundian territories, South Netherlandish, c.1425-50
silver, silver gilt, and painted enamel, Overall: 20 cm x 11.7 cm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cloisters Collection, 1952 (52.50) Photo: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), South Netherlandish
Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), South Netherlandish, c.1427-1432
oil on oak, Overall (open): 64.5 cm x 117.8 cm, central panel: 64.1 cm x 63.2 cm, each wing: 64.5 cm x 27.3 cm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cloisters Collection, 1956 (56.70a–c) Photo: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
The Unicorn in Captivity, South Netherlandish
The Unicorn in Captivity, South Netherlandish, c.1495-1505
wool, silk, and silver and gilded-silver wrapped thread, 368 cm x 251.5 cm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., 1937 (37.80.6) Photo: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
The Cloisters Playing Cards
The Cloisters Playing Cards, c.1475-1480
paper (four layers in pasteboard) with pen and ink, opaque paint, glazes, and applied silver and gold, 13.2 cm x 7 cm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Cloisters Collection, 1983 (1983.515.1-52) Photo: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
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